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MARKETING SHOULD BE A TOP PRIORITY FOR ANYONE INTERESTED IN SELLING A HOME. THE EXPERTS AT LINDERMAN SNAVELY REALTORS LLC PRESENT COMMON STAGING MISTAKES AND HOW TO AVOID THEM HERE.

 Selling your home requires a variety of tasks and procedures that often seem daunting. After reading this article, one thing potential sellers can cross off their list, is staging a home appropriately. Whether a professional stager has been hired or not, sellers can do their due diligence in ensuring the home is staged perfectly. You may have the exact home that a buyer is looking for. However, if staged incorrectly, you could miss out on a monumental opportunity.

DE-CLUTTERING MAY LEAD TO AN EMPTY AND UNRELATABLE SPACE

Often times, sellers will want to clear their space of furniture, knick-knacks and old antiques that are simply taking over the room. When this process is over, far too often is the room left empty. Reducing furniture isn’t a bad idea, so long as the room does not appear cold afterwards.

PAINT JOBS HAVE NOT BEEN TOUCHED UP

When a potential buyer sees a poor paint job, they’re not only seeing chips or holes, they’re seeing time, money and effort being put into repainting a space. Most buyers want to purchase a home they can live in soon after purchase. Leaving them with jobs to do might turn potential buyers away.

WALL-TO-WALL CARPETING IS STAINED AND/OR OLD

Unless your floors are in fairly good condition, it might be worth it to hire a professional to redo your floors. Wall-to-wall carpeting is outdated. Combine an outdated look with old stains and you may be facing a low-traffic open house.

TOO MANY COLLECTIBLES MAKES A SPACE TOO BUSY

It makes sense when sellers want to spruce up a master bedroom or a living area with decor. You do not want your area to come off like a antique store or museum. Select a few art or photography pieces and mindfully place them about. Let them exist in a harmonious way that invites the potential buyer.

FORGETTING THE THREE-FOOT-FIVE RULE

Many sellers are not aware of the three-foot-five rule, a rule that can make or break a living space to the potential buyer. It’s important to keep furniture in the three-foot or five-foot range. You may think a tall vase or tall lamp might make an area more interesting, but refrain from doing so. After a potential buyer enters the space, their eyes will go from the space, to the window first. If there is too much visual interruption, it will make the room feel small and far too busy.

THERE IS A LACK OF CARPETS OR RUGS

Incorporating an appealing rug under a coffee table or near a chair is a sure way to section off space, making the room feel larger and more inviting. Think of the room as having different quarters, as this is what your potential buyer is subconsciously as well. They don’t see a carpet under a center table, they see a cozy corner of the room where they’ll get some reading done, or where the kids will gather for a family movie.

PLANTS ARE MISSING FROM THE SPACE

There is no greater sin than a living space lacking plants. Not only is it scientifically proven that plants release oxygen and absorb carbon dioxide to eliminate harmful toxins, but they visually bring a room to life too. Whether it be a bouquet of flowers on the dining room table, or a few succulents on a windowsill, incorporate plantlife into your home.

By avoiding these simple mistakes when staging your home, you’ll be ensuring that your space is decluttered, inviting and warm. When you correctly market your home, your buyer will envision living in the space, and be far more inclined to move forward. For more information on how to appeal to your buyer and for other staging tips, contact the realtors from Linderman Snavely Realtors LLC today.